Effect of Cattail (Typha domingensis) Extracts, Leachates, and Selected Phenolic Compounds on Rates of Oxygen Production by Salvinia (Salvinia minima)

Gallardo, Maria T. and Ascher, Jennifer R. and Collier, M. Jordan and Martin, Barbara B. and Martin, Dean F. (1999) Effect of Cattail (Typha domingensis) Extracts, Leachates, and Selected Phenolic Compounds on Rates of Oxygen Production by Salvinia (Salvinia minima). Journal of Aquatic Plant Management, 37, pp. 80-82.

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Abstract

Salvinia (Salvinia minima Willd.) is a water fern found in Florida waters, usually associated with Lemna and other small free-floating species. Due to its buoyancy and mat-forming abilities, it is spread by moving waters. In 1994, salvinia was reported to be present in 247 water bodies in the state (out of 451 surveyed public waters, Schardt 1997). It is a small, rapidly growing species that can become a nuisance due to its explosive growth rates and its ability to shade underwater life (Oliver 1993). Any efforts toward management of salvinia populations must consider that, in reasonable amounts, its presence is desirable since it plays an important role in the overall ecosystem balance. New management alternatives need to be explored besides the conventional herbicide treatments; for example, it has been shown that the growth of S. molesta can be inhibited by extracts of the tropical weed parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) and its purified toxin parthenin (Pande 1994, 1996). We believe that cattail, Typha spp. may be a candidate for control of S. minima infestations. Cattail is an aggressive aquatic plant, and has the ability to expand over areas that weren't previously occupied by other species (Gallardo et al. 1998a and references cited there). In South Florida, T. domingensis is a natural component of the Everglades ecosystem, but in many cases it has become the dominant marsh species, outcompeting other native plants. In Florida public waters, this cattail species is the most dominant emergent species of aquatic plants (Schardt 1997). Several factors enable it to accomplish opportunistic expansion, including size, growth habits, adaptability to changes in the surroundings, and the release of compounds that can prevent the growth and development of other species. We have been concerned in the past with the inhibitory effects of the T. domingensis extracts, and the phenolic compounds mentioned before, towards the growth and propagation of S. minima (Gallardo et al. 1998b). This investigation deals with the impact of cattail materials on the rates of oxygen production of salvinia, as determined through a series of Warburg experiments (Martin et al. 1987, Prindle and Martin 1996).

Item Type: Article
Title: Effect of Cattail (Typha domingensis) Extracts, Leachates, and Selected Phenolic Compounds on Rates of Oxygen Production by Salvinia (Salvinia minima)
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Gallardo, Maria T.jeveritt@weslaco.ars.usda.gov
Ascher, Jennifer R.
Collier, M. Jordan
Martin, Barbara B.
Martin, Dean F.
Refereed: Yes
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Aquatic Plant Management
Volume: 37
Page Range: pp. 80-82
Date: 1999
Issuing Agency: Aquatic Plant Management Society, Inc.
Uncontrolled Keywords: waterhyacinth; light reflectance; aerial vidography; hydrilla; Hydrilla verticillata; Eichhornia crassipes; Rio Grande River, Texas; Texas; global positioning system; geographic information system; aquatic weeds
Subjects: Management
Biology
Environment
Item ID: 1772
Depositing User: Natalie Wiest
Date Deposited: 01 Dec 2008 22:33
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 20:05
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/1772

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