Functional morphology of cephalopod gills

Eno, Nancy Clare (1987) Functional morphology of cephalopod gills. PhD Thesis, University of Cambridge, 350pp.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Section 1; Large File) (The document's language is English .) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (58Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (Section 2; Large File) (The document's language is English .) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (58Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (Section 3; Large File) (The document's language is English .) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (26Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (Images at higher resolution; Large File) (The document's language is English .) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (40Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
PDF (Eno_Appendices) (The document's language is English .) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (13Mb) | Preview

Abstract

There is a wealth of literature dealing with fish gills (Review, see Hoar & Randall, 1984), yet hardly anything is known about the gills of cephalopods. This is rather surprising considering the commercial importance of the cephalopods. In view of the paucity of information available it was necessary to start by establishing the morphology of the gills. This is covered in the first section of this thesis. Of all the cephalopods, Octopus vulgaris was singled out for more detailed investigation (see chapters 2 & 3) as its physiology is comparatively well understood (Wells, 1978). The gills of cephalopods are the major sites for respiratory gaseous exchange. It follows that their dimensions might be expected to govern their potential for absorbing oxygen. Section two deals with the morphometries of cephalopod gills, and predicted values are compared with physiological measurements of oxygen uptake for four representative The final section describes the physiological experiments I performed on octopuses. These experiments were designed to find out whether the animals could regulate the gills' potential to take up oxygen through changes to the gills themselves.

Item Type: Thesis
Title: Functional morphology of cephalopod gills
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Eno, Nancy Clare
Number of Pages: 350
Date: 1987
Department: Darwin College
Institution: University of Cambridge
Additional Information: The dissertation has been divided into 4 parts to keep the size manageable for downloading (three sections + appendices). The dissertation contains 34 pages of photographs. These are included in the dissertation, but those are B&W and at relatively low resolution. They were then re-scanned at high-resolution grayscale (600 dpi TIFF). A separate file with 300 dpi jpg versions of the images is here. If even higher resolution versions are needed, contact the Miller Library at Hopkins Marine Station.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Octopus
Subjects: Biology
Item ID: 2032
Depositing User: Joe Wible
Date Deposited: 23 Apr 2009 17:15
Last Modified: 11 May 2012 19:42
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/2032

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...