A Comparison of Two Methods for Enhancing the Recovery of Seagrasses into Propellor Scars: Mechanical Injection of a Nutrient and Growth Hormone Solution vs. Defecation by Roosting Seabirds: Final Report.

Kenworthy, W. Judson and Fonseca, Mark S. and Whitfield, Paula E. and Hammerstrom, Kamille and Schwarzschild, Arthur C. (2000) A Comparison of Two Methods for Enhancing the Recovery of Seagrasses into Propellor Scars: Mechanical Injection of a Nutrient and Growth Hormone Solution vs. Defecation by Roosting Seabirds: Final Report. Beaufort, NC, NOAA/National Ocean Service/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science/Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research,

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Abstract

Based on the recovery rates for Thalassia testudinum measured in this study for scars of these excavation depths and assuming a linear recovery horizon, we estimate that it would take ~ 6.9 years (95% CI. = 5.4 to 9.6 years) for T. testudinum to return to the same density as recorded for the adjacent undisturbed population. The application of water soluble fertilizers and plant growth hormones by mechanical injection into the sediments adjacent to ten propellor scars at Lignumvitae State Botanical Site did not significantly increase the recovery rate of Thalassia testudinum or Halodule wrightii. An alternative method of fertilization and restoration of propellor scars was also tested by a using a method of “compressed succession” where Halodule wrightii is substituted for T. testudinum in the initial stages of restoration. Bird roosting stakes were placed among H.wrightii bare root plantings in prop scars to facilitate the defecation of nitrogen and phosphorus enriched feces. In contrast to the fertilizer injection method, the bird stakes produced extremely high recovery rates of transplanted H. wrightii. We conclude that use of a fertilizer/hormone injection machine in the manner described here is not a feasible means of enhancing T. testudinum recovery in propellor scars on soft bottom carbonate sediments. Existing techniques such as the bird stake approach provide a reliable, and inexpensive alternative method that should be considered for application to restoration of seagrasses in these environments. Document contains 40 pages)

Item Type: Monograph or Serial Issue
Title: A Comparison of Two Methods for Enhancing the Recovery of Seagrasses into Propellor Scars: Mechanical Injection of a Nutrient and Growth Hormone Solution vs. Defecation by Roosting Seabirds: Final Report.
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Kenworthy, W. JudsonJud.Kenworthy@noaa.gov
Fonseca, Mark S.Mark.Fonseca@noaa.gov
Whitfield, Paula E.Paula.Whitfield@noaa.gov
Hammerstrom, Kamille
Schwarzschild, Arthur C.
Date: 2000
Publisher: NOAA/National Ocean Service/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science/Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research
Place of Publication: Beaufort, NC
Issuing Agency: United States National Ocean Service
Subjects: Ecology
Management
Item ID: 2105
Depositing User: Patti M. Marraro
Date Deposited: 19 May 2009 18:59
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 19:39
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/2105

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