A review of the ecological effectiveness of subtidal marine reserves in Central California, Part II: Summary of existing marine reserves in Central California and their potential benefits

Starr, Richard M. and Carr, Mark H. and Caselle, Jennifer and Estes, James A. and Syms, Craig and VenTresca, David A. and Yoklavich, Mary M. (2004) A review of the ecological effectiveness of subtidal marine reserves in Central California, Part II: Summary of existing marine reserves in Central California and their potential benefits. Silver Spring, MD, NOAA/National Ocean Service/Marine Sanctuaries Division, (Marine Sanctuaries Conservation Series, MSD-04)

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Abstract

In Central California, and elsewhere around the world, a great deal of discussion is occurring about the use of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a tool to help manage marine resources. This discussion is taking place because there is growing evidence that humans have depleted marine resources in many parts of the world, often despite strong regulatory efforts. Moreover, there is also mounting evidence that the degradation of marine resources began long ago, and we do not fully realize how much humans have altered “natural” environments. This uncertainty has led people to discuss the use of MPAs as a precautionary tool to prevent depletion or extinction of marine resources, and as a means of redressing past damages. The discussion about the use of marine reserves is increasing in intensity in California because several resource management agencies are considering reserves as they create or revise management plans. Often, the discussions surrounding this important public policy debate lead to questions about the biological or ecological value of existing marine protected areas. More than 100 MPAs exist along the coast of California. Many of these were established arbitrarily and lack specific purposes. Some California marine protected areas also have co-occurring or overlapping boundaries, have conflicting designations for use, and have conflicting rules and regulations. Because few of the existing marine protected areas have clearly articulated goals or objectives, however, it is difficult or impossible to evaluate their ecological effectiveness. (PDF contains 18 pages.)

Item Type: Monograph or Serial Issue
Title: A review of the ecological effectiveness of subtidal marine reserves in Central California, Part II: Summary of existing marine reserves in Central California and their potential benefits
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Starr, Richard M.
Carr, Mark H.
Caselle, Jennifer
Estes, James A.
Syms, Craig
VenTresca, David A.
Yoklavich, Mary M.
Series Name: Marine Sanctuaries Conservation Series
Number: MSD-04
Date: 2004
Publisher: NOAA/National Ocean Service/Marine Sanctuaries Division
Place of Publication: Silver Spring, MD
Issuing Agency: United States National Ocean Service
Subjects: Ecology
Conservation
Management
Item ID: 2349
Depositing User: Patti M. Marraro
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2009 19:17
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 19:11
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/2349

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