The distribution and size composition of finfish, American lobster, and long-finned squid in Long Island Sound based on the Connecticut Fisheries Division Bottom Trawl Survey, 1984–1994

Gottschall, Kurt F. and Johnson, Mark W. and Simpson, David G. (2000) The distribution and size composition of finfish, American lobster, and long-finned squid in Long Island Sound based on the Connecticut Fisheries Division Bottom Trawl Survey, 1984–1994. Seattle, WA, NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service, (NOAA Technical Report NMFS, 148)

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Abstract

The distribution, abundance, and length composition of marine finfish, lobster, and squid in Long Island Sound were examined relative to season and physical features of the Sound, using Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection trawl survey data collected from 1984 to 1994. The following are presented: seasonal distribution maps for 59 species, abundance indices for 41 species, and length frequencies for 26 species. In addition, a broader view of habitat utilization in the Sound was examined by mapping aggregated catches (total catch per tow, demersal catch per tow, and pelagic catch per tow) and by comparing species richness and mean aggregate catch/tow by analysis of variance (ANOVA) among eight habitat types defined by depth interval and bottom type. For many individual species, seasonal migration patterns and preference for particular areas within Long Island Sound were evident. The aggregate distribution maps show that overall abundance was lower in the eastern Sound than the central and western portions. Demersal and pelagic temporal abundance show opposite trends—demersals were abundant in spring and declined through summer and fall, whereas pelagic abundance was low in spring and increased into fall. The analysis of habitat types revealed significant differences for both species richness and mean catch per tow. Generally, species richness was highest in habitats within the central area of the Sound and lowest in eastern habitats. The aggregate mean catch was highest in the western and central habitats, and declined eastward. (PDF file contains 199 pages.)

Item Type: Monograph or Serial Issue
Title: The distribution and size composition of finfish, American lobster, and long-finned squid in Long Island Sound based on the Connecticut Fisheries Division Bottom Trawl Survey, 1984–1994
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Gottschall, Kurt F.
Johnson, Mark W.
Simpson, David G.
Series Name: NOAA Technical Report NMFS
Number: 148
Date: 2000
Publisher: NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service
Place of Publication: Seattle, WA
Issuing Agency: United States National Marine Fisheries Service
Subjects: Ecology
Management
Fisheries
Item ID: 2521
Depositing User: Patti M. Marraro
Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2009 17:06
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 19:00
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/2521

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