The History, Present Condition, and Future of the Molluscan Fisheries of North and Central America and Europe: Volume 2, Pacific Coast and Supplemental Topics

MacKenzie, Jr., Clyde L. and Burrell, Jr., Victor G. and Rosenfield, Aaron and Hobart, Willis L. (1997) The History, Present Condition, and Future of the Molluscan Fisheries of North and Central America and Europe: Volume 2, Pacific Coast and Supplemental Topics. NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service, (NOAA Technical Report NMFS, 128)

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Abstract

Over 100 molluscan species are landed in Mexico. About 30% are harvested on the Pacific coast and 70% on the Atlantic coast. Clams, scallops, and squid predominate on the Pacific coast (abalone, limpets, and mussels are landed there exclusively). Conchs and oysters predominate on the Atlantic coast. In 1988, some 95,000 metric tons (t) of mollusks were landed, with a value of $33 million. Mollusks were used extensively in prehispanic Mexico as food, tools, and jewelry. Their use as food and jewelry continues. Except in the States of Baja California and Baja California Sur, where abalone, clams, and scallops provide fishermen with year-round employment, mollusk fishing is done part time. On both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts, many fishermen are nomads, harvesting mollusks wherever they find abundant stocks. Upon finding such beds, they build camps, begin harvesting, and continue until the mollusks become so scarce that it no longer pays to continue. They then look for productive beds in other areas and rebuild their camps. Fishermen harvest abalones, mussels, scallops, and clams by free-diving and using scuba and hooka. Landings of clams and cockles have been growing, and 22,000 t were landed in 1988. Fishermen harvest intertidal clams by hand at wading depths, finding them with their feet. In waters up to 5 m, they harvest them by free-diving. In deeper water, they use scuba and hooka. Many species of gastropods have commercial importance on both coasts. All species with a large detachable muscle are sold as scallops. On the Pacific coast, hatchery culture of oysters prevails. Oyster culture in Atlantic coast lagoons began in the 1950's, when beds were enhanced by spreading shells as cultch for spat. (PDF file contains 228 pages.)

Item Type: Monograph or Serial Issue
Title: The History, Present Condition, and Future of the Molluscan Fisheries of North and Central America and Europe: Volume 2, Pacific Coast and Supplemental Topics
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
MacKenzie, Jr., Clyde L.
Burrell, Jr., Victor G.
Rosenfield, Aaron
Hobart, Willis L.
Series Name: NOAA Technical Report NMFS
Number: 128
Date: 1997
Publisher: NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service
Subjects: Ecology
Management
Fisheries
Item ID: 2687
Depositing User: Patti M. Marraro
Date Deposited: 31 Oct 2009 19:05
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 18:35
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/2687

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