Migrations of yellowfin and skipjack tuna in the Eastern Pacific Ocean as determined by tagging experiments, 1952-1964

Fink, Bernard D. and Bayliff, William H. (1970) Migrations of yellowfin and skipjack tuna in the Eastern Pacific Ocean as determined by tagging experiments, 1952-1964. Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission Bulletin, 15(1), pp. 1-227.

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Abstract

ENGLISH: Totals of 59,547 tagged yellowfin and 90,412 tagged skipjack were released during 1952-1964 throughout the range of the fishery in the eastern Pacific Ocean during that period. Most of the fish were released from commercial baitboats, either on regular fishing trips or on chartered trips to catch fish for tagging. There we re 8,397 yellowfin and 4,381 skipjack returned from these releases. There appear to be two main groups of yellowfin in the eastern Pacific Ocean. There is considerable intermingling among the fish of the two groups, however. The fish of the northern group (west coast of Baja California, Gulf of California, and Revillagigedo Islands) first appear in the Revillagigedo Islands in about April, and migrate north along the Baja California coast during the spring and summer and south along that coast during the fall. Recruits to the southern group (Tres Marias Islands to northern Chile) appear at many points or continuously along most of the coast. The fish which first appear in the northern Panama Bight in April migrate rapidly northwest to Central America and Mexico and south to the Gulf of Guayaquil. There also appear to be two main groups of skipjack in the eastern Pacific Ocean. The fish of the northern group (west coast of Baja California, Gulf of California, and Revillagigedo Islands ) perform about the same migration as do the yellowfin of the same area, but most of the skipjack apparently then migrate to the central Pacific Ocean during the fall and/or winter. Recruits to the southern group (Central America to northern Chile) appear mostly in or near the Panama Bight. The fish which first appear in the northern Panama Bight in April migrate rapidly northwest to Central America and south to the Gulf of Guayaquil. The proportions which migrate in these directions vary considerably from year to year, this perhaps being dependent on differences in the sea-surface temperatures. SPANISH: Durante el período de 1952-1964 se liberó a través de todos los límites de distribución de la pesquería en el Océano Pacífico oriental un total de 59,547 aleta amarilla y 90,412 barriletes marcados. La mayoria de los peces fueron liberados de barcos de carnada comerciales, o en viajes regulares de pesca o en viajes en los que se fletaron los barcos para capturar atunes y marcarlos. De estas líberaciones se recapturaron 8,397 aleta amarilla y 4,381 barriletes. Parece que haya dos grupos principales de aleta amarilla en el Océano Pacífico oriental. Sin embargo, existe una entremezcla considerable entre los peces de los dos grupos. Los peces del grupo septentrional (costa occidental de Baja California, Golfo de California y Islas Revillagigedo) aparecen primero en las Islas Revillagigedo alrededor de abril, y durante la primavera y el verano se desplazan al norte a lo largo de la costa de Baja California y durante el otoño al sur a lo largo de la costa. Los reclutas del grupo meridional (Islas Tres Marias hasta el norte de Chile) aparecen en muchas partes o continuamente a lo largo de la mayoría de la costa. Los peces que aparecen primero en la región septentrional del Panamá Bight en abril se desplazan rápidamente al noroeste a la América Central y México y al sur al Golfo de Guayaquil. Parece también que existen dos grupos principales de barrilete en el Océano Pacífico oriental. Los peces del gr upo septentrional (costa occidental de Baja California, Golfo de California e Islas Revillagigedo ) realizan casi la misma migración que el atún aleta amarilla de la misma área, pero aparentemente la mayor parte del barrilete se desplaza luego al Océano Pacífico central durante el otoño y/o en el invierno. Los reclutas al grupo meridional (América Central al norte de Chile) aparecen en su mayoría en el Panamá Bight o cerca a este lugar. Los peces que aparecen primero en la región septentrional del Panamá Bight en abril se desplazan rápidamente al noroeste a la América Central y al sur al Golfo de Guayaquil. Las proporciones que se desplazan en estas direcciones varían considerablemente de año a año; tal vez esto depende en las diferencias de temperatura de la superficie del mar. (PDF contains 227 pages.)

Item Type: Article
Title: Migrations of yellowfin and skipjack tuna in the Eastern Pacific Ocean as determined by tagging experiments, 1952-1964
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Fink, Bernard D.
Bayliff, William H.
Journal or Publication Title: Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission Bulletin
Volume: 15
Number: 1
Page Range: pp. 1-227
Date: 1970
Issuing Agency: Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission
Additional Information: This article is bilingual and contains both Spanish and English translations.
Uncontrolled Keywords: fish migrations; yellowfin tuna; skipjack tuna; Eastern Pacific Ocean; tagging experiments; atún aleta amarilla; barrilete; Océano Pacifico Oriental; marcación
Subjects: Fisheries
Item ID: 3167
Depositing User: Joan Parker
Date Deposited: 13 Apr 2010 11:57
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 17:49
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/3167

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