Productivity of Florida Springs: Second annual report to Biology Branch, Office of Naval Research progress from January 1 to December 31, 1954

Odum, Howard T. and Yount, James L. and Natelson, Delle and Caldwell, David K. and Berry, Frederick H. (1954) Productivity of Florida Springs: Second annual report to Biology Branch, Office of Naval Research progress from January 1 to December 31, 1954. Gainesville, FL, University of Florida, Gainesville, Department of Biology,

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Abstract

Production measurements at different times of the year indicate a linear relationship of light intensity and overall production at about 8% of the visible light energy reaching plant level. Measurements of a coral reef at Eniwetok indicate 6%. Further evidence of breeding at all seasons but with a quantitative pulse in the seasons of maximum light indicates that the seasonal fluctuation in primary production is routed through reproduction rather than through major changes in populations. The succession of plants and anmals of the aufwuchs has been shown with glass slides and counts from Sagittaria blades. Losss of oxygen bubbles during the day and emergence of aquatic insects at night have been measured with funnels. Bell jar measurements are reported for bacterial metabolism on mud surfaces. pH determined CO2 uptake agrees with titration determinations. A few rough estimates of herbivore production have been made from caged snails, aufwuchs succession, and fish tagging. Nitrate uptake a night by aufwuchs communities has been confirmed in a circulating microcosm experiment as well as in bell jars in the springs. Distributions of oxygen and organisms have been used to criticize the saprobe stream classification system. Theoretical consideration of maximum photosynthetic rates in teh literature data indicates logarithmic rate variation inversely with organismal size just as for respiratory metabolism. Extreme pyramid shapes are thus shown for communities in which organismal size decreases up the food chain and for other communities with the same energy influx but with organismal size increasing up the food chain. Literature data is used to further demonstrate the validity of the optimum efficiency-maximum power principle for photosynthesis. Work on plants by Dr. Delle Natelson indicates essential stability of aquatic plant communities after 3 years and about 10-20% reproducibility in previous biomass estimates by Davis. Work on an animal picture of the fishery characteristics by Caldwell, Barry, and Odum is half completed. The study of aquatic insects in relationship to spring gradients by W.C. Sloan has been completed an an M.S. thesis. J. Yount has begun a study of affect of total productivity on community composition using aufwuchs organisms on glass slides placed in different current and light conditions in Silver Springs. (49pp.)

Item Type: Monograph or Serial Issue
Title: Productivity of Florida Springs: Second annual report to Biology Branch, Office of Naval Research progress from January 1 to December 31, 1954
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Odum, Howard T.
Yount, James L.
Natelson, Delle
Caldwell, David K.
Berry, Frederick H.
Date: 1954
Publisher: University of Florida, Gainesville, Department of Biology
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Uncontrolled Keywords: Silver springs; springs; insects; algae; aufwuchs; diatoms; productivity; Florida; fishes;
Subjects: Ecology
Limnology
Item ID: 373
Depositing User: Stephanie Haas
Date Deposited: 22 Oct 2007 19:28
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 22:09
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/373

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