Five concepts in planning theory useful to coastal management

Marcucci, Daniel and Russell, March and Smith, Betsy and Wainger, Lisa (2010) Five concepts in planning theory useful to coastal management. In: Shifting Shorelines: Adapting to the Future,The 22nd International Conference of The Coastal Society , June 13-16, 2010 ,Wilmington, North Carolina,

[img]
Preview
PDF (The document's language is English .) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (48Kb) | Preview
Official URL: http://nsgl.gso.uri.edu/coastalsociety/TCS22/paper...

Abstract

In recent years coastal resource management has begun to stand as its own discipline. Its multidisciplinary nature gives it access to theory situated in each of the diverse fields which it may encompass, yet management practices often revert to the primary field of the manager. There is a lack of a common set of “coastal” theory from which managers can draw. Seven resource-related issues with which coastal area managers must contend include: coastal habitat conservation, traditional maritime communities and economies, strong development and use pressures, adaptation to sea level rise and climate change, landscape sustainability and resilience, coastal hazards, and emerging energy technologies. The complexity and range of human and environmental interactions at the coast suggest a strong need for a common body of coastal management theory which managers would do well to understand generally. Planning theory, which itself is a synthesis of concepts from multiple fields, contains ideas generally valuable to coastal management. Planning theory can not only provide an example of how to develop a multi- or transdisciplinary set of theory, but may also provide actual theoretical foundation for a coastal theory. In particular we discuss five concepts in the planning theory discourse and present their utility for coastal resource managers. These include “wicked” problems, ecological planning, the epistemology of knowledge communities, the role of the planner/ manager, and collaborative planning. While these theories are known and familiar to some professionals working at the coast, we argue that there is a need for broader understanding amongst the various specialists working in the increasingly identifiable field of coastal resource management. (PDF contains 4 pages)

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Title: Five concepts in planning theory useful to coastal management
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Marcucci, Danielmarcuccid@ecu.edu
Russell, March
Smith, Betsy
Wainger, Lisa
Date: 2010
Funders: National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. EPA Coastal Management Branch, U.S. Geolgocial Survey, NOAA Sea Grant
Event Title: Shifting Shorelines: Adapting to the Future,The 22nd International Conference of The Coastal Society
Event Type: Conference
Event Location: Wilmington, North Carolina
Event Dates: June 13-16, 2010
Issuing Agency: The Coastal Society
Uncontrolled Keywords: TCS22
Subjects: Earth Sciences
Environment
Planning
Item ID: 3934
Depositing User: Cynthia Murray
Date Deposited: 29 Jul 2010 13:30
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 16:41
Related URLs:
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/3934

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...