Encouraging sustainable development in a coastal community: New Hanover County, North Carolina's exceptional design zoning district

Ralston, Shawn (2010) Encouraging sustainable development in a coastal community: New Hanover County, North Carolina's exceptional design zoning district. In: Shifting Shorelines: Adapting to the Future,The 22nd International Conference of The Coastal Society , June 13-16, 2010 ,Wilmington, North Carolina,

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Official URL: http://nsgl.gso.uri.edu/coastalsociety/TCS22/paper...

Abstract

While New Hanover County is the second smallest county in North Carolina, it is also the second most densely populated with approximately 850 people per square mile. Nestled between the Cape Fear River and Atlantic Ocean with surrounding barrier island beach communities, the County’s geographic location provides a prime vacation destination, as well as an ideal location for residents who wish to live at the water’s edge. Wilmington is the largest city in the County with a population just under 200,000. Most of the Wilmington metropolitan area is developed, creating intense development pressures for the remaining undeveloped land in the unincorporated County. In order to provide development opportunities for mixed use or high density projects within unincorporated New Hanover County where appropriate urban features are in place to support such projects without the negative effects of urban sprawl, County Planning Staff recently developed an Exceptional Design Zoning District (EDZD). Largely based on the LEED for Neighborhood Development program, the EDZD standards were scaled to fit the unique conditions of the County with the goal of encouraging sustainable development while providing density incentives to entice the use of the voluntary district. The incentive for the voluntary zoning district is increased density in areas where the density may not be allowed under normal circumstances. The rationale behind allowing for higher density projects is that development can be concentrated in areas where appropriate urban features are in place to support such projects, and the tendency toward urban sprawl can be minimized. With water quality being of high importance, it is perceived that higher density development will better protect water quality then lower density projects. (PDF contains 4 pages)

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Title: Encouraging sustainable development in a coastal community: New Hanover County, North Carolina's exceptional design zoning district
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Ralston, ShawnsRalston@nhcgov.com
Date: 2010
Funders: National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. EPA Coastal Management Branch, U.S. Geolgocial Survey, NOAA Sea Grant
Event Title: Shifting Shorelines: Adapting to the Future,The 22nd International Conference of The Coastal Society
Event Type: Conference
Event Location: Wilmington, North Carolina
Event Dates: June 13-16, 2010
Issuing Agency: The Coastal Society
Uncontrolled Keywords: TCS22
Subjects: Environment
Planning
Item ID: 3946
Depositing User: Cynthia Murray
Date Deposited: 29 Jul 2010 13:17
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 16:42
Related URLs:
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/3946

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