Southeast White Oak River shellfish restoration project

Tursi, Frank (2010) Southeast White Oak River shellfish restoration project. In: Shifting Shorelines: Adapting to the Future,The 22nd International Conference of The Coastal Society , June 13-16, 2010 ,Wilmington, North Carolina,

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Official URL: http://nsgl.gso.uri.edu/coastalsociety/TCS22/paper...

Abstract

The 42-mile-long White Oak River is one of the last relatively unblemished watery jewels of the N.C. coast. The predominantly black water river meanders through Jones, Carteret and Onslow counties along the central N.C. coast, gradually widening as it flows past Swansboro and into the Atlantic Ocean. It drains almost 12,000 acres of estuaries -- saltwater marshes lined with cordgrass, narrow and impenetrable hardwood swamps and rare stands of red cedar that are flooded with wind tides. The lower portion of the river was so renowned for fat oysters and clams that in times past competing watermen came to blows over its bounty at places that now bear names like Battleground Rock. The lower river is also a designated primary nursery area for such commercially important species as shrimp, spot, Atlantic croaker, blue crabs, weakfish and southern flounder. But the river has been discovered. The permanent population along the lower White Oak increased by almost a third since 1990, and the amount of developed land increased 82 percent during the same period. With the growth have come bacteria. Since the late 1990s, much of the lower White Oak has been added to North Carolina’s list of impaired waters because of bacterial pollution. Forty-two percent of the rivers’ oyster and clam beds are permanently closed to shellfishing because of high bacteria levels. Fully two-thirds of the river’s shellfish beds are now permanently off limits or close temporarily after a moderate rain. State monitoring indicates that increased runoff from urbanization is the probable cause of the bacterial pollution. (PDF contains 4 pages)

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Title: Southeast White Oak River shellfish restoration project
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Tursi, Franklookoutkeeper@nccoast.org
Date: 2010
Funders: National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. EPA Coastal Management Branch, U.S. Geolgocial Survey, NOAA Sea Grant
Event Title: Shifting Shorelines: Adapting to the Future,The 22nd International Conference of The Coastal Society
Event Type: Conference
Event Location: Wilmington, North Carolina
Event Dates: June 13-16, 2010
Issuing Agency: The Coastal Society
Uncontrolled Keywords: TCS22
Subjects: Conservation
Aquaculture
Item ID: 3959
Depositing User: Cynthia Murray
Date Deposited: 29 Jul 2010 12:51
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 16:43
Related URLs:
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/3959

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