Design of a Recreational Fishing Survey and Mark-Recapture Study for the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, in Chesapeake Bay

Miller, Thomas J. and Fogarty, Michael J. and Lipcius, Romuald and Hoenig, John (2000) Design of a Recreational Fishing Survey and Mark-Recapture Study for the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, in Chesapeake Bay. Solomons, MD, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, (UMCES Technical Series, 299-01)

[img]
Preview
PDF (The document's language is English .) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (136Kb) | Preview

Abstract

The development of bay wide estimates of recreational harvest has been identified as a high priority by the Chesapeake Bay Scientific Advisory Committee (CBSAC) and by the Chesapeake Bay Program as reflected in the Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab Fishery Management Plan (Chesapeake Bay Program 1996). In addition, the BiState Blue Crab Commission (BBCAC), formed in 1996 by mandate from the legislatures of Maryland and Virginia to advise on crab management, has also recognized the importance of estimating the levels and trends in catches in the recreational fishery. Recently, the BBCAC has adopted limit and target biological reference points. These analyses have been predicated on assumptions regarding the relative magnitude of the recreational and commercial catch. The reference points depend on determination of the total number of crabs removed from the population. In essence, the number removed by the various fishery sectors, represents a minimum estimate of the population size. If a major fishery sector is not represented, the total population will be accordingly underestimated. If the relative contribution of the unrepresented sector is constant over time and harvests the same components of the population as the other sectors, it may be argued that the population estimate derived from the other sectors is biased but still adequately represents trends in population size over time. If either of the two constraints mentioned above is not met, the validity of relative trends over time is suspect. With the recent increases in the human population in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, there is reason to be concerned that the recreational catch may not have been a constant proportion of the total harvest over time. It is important to assess the catch characteristics and the magnitude of the recreational fishery to evaluate this potential bias. (PDF contains 70 pages)

Item Type: Monograph or Serial Issue
Title: Design of a Recreational Fishing Survey and Mark-Recapture Study for the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, in Chesapeake Bay
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Miller, Thomas J.Miller@cbl.umces.edu
Fogarty, Michael J.
Lipcius, Romuald
Hoenig, John
Series Name: UMCES Technical Series
Number: 299-01
Date: 2000
Publisher: University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
Place of Publication: Solomons, MD
Funders: Chesapeake Bay Stock Assessment Committee, NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office
Issuing Agency: University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
Additional Information: Draft of Final Report
Uncontrolled Keywords: Blue Crab; Chesapeake Bay; Maryland; Virginia; Survey
Subjects: Conservation
Ecology
Management
Fisheries
Item ID: 4126
Depositing User: Kathleen Heil
Date Deposited: 20 Aug 2010 12:21
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 16:23
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/4126

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...