Physiological Determinants of Invasive Success Linking Distribution Patterns to Metabolic Physiology in Native and Invasive Blue Mussels (genus Mytilus)

Linsmayer, Lauren (2011) Physiological Determinants of Invasive Success Linking Distribution Patterns to Metabolic Physiology in Native and Invasive Blue Mussels (genus Mytilus). Other Thesis, Stanford University, 56pp.

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Abstract

In the early 20th century, a blue mussel species from the Mediterranean invaded the California coast and subsequently out-competed the native species south of Monterey Bay. Like other invasive species, Mytilus galloprovincialis has physiological traits that make it successful in habitats formerly occupied by the native M. trossulus, namely its adaptation to warm sea surface temperatures. This study looks at the current genotype distributions and enzymatic activities of field-acclimatized mussels within the hybrid zone where the species co-occur as well as mussels that have been acclimated for four weeks to different temperature and salinity conditions. In the field-acclimatized and laboratory-acclimated mussels, the native species exhibited significantly higher enzyme rates, which may reflect an evolutionary adaptation to compensate to low habitat temperatures. Indeed, the results of the laboratory acclimation indicate that these differences are genetically based. Whether an acclimation capacity exists may require even longer-term acclimation to different temperatures. Current findings suggest that the further spread of the invasive species is likely to be governed in large measure by the potentially counteracting effects of rising temperatures, which would favor the northerly spread of M. galloprovincialis, and increased winter precipitation, which would favor the persistence of M. trossulus. However, the success of M. galloprovincialis during acclimation to ‘dilute’ salinity (25 ppt) suggests that the invasive species can tolerate a greater salinity range than previously thought. Thus, further investigation is needed to build a comprehensive predictive model of the movement of M. galloprovincialis and the hybrid zone along the California coast.

Item Type: Thesis
Title: Physiological Determinants of Invasive Success Linking Distribution Patterns to Metabolic Physiology in Native and Invasive Blue Mussels (genus Mytilus)
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Linsmayer, Lauren
Series Name: Honors Thesis
Number of Pages: 56
Date: 16 May 2011
Institution: Stanford University
Additional Information: Honors Thesis (Bachelors) for Earth Systems (Interdisciplinary Program). Copyright permission signed by the author is on file with the IAMSLIC archive.
Subjects: Biology
Ecology
Environment
Item ID: 6603
Depositing User: Joe Wible
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2011 20:50
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2011 13:16
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/6603

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