A review of IATTC research on the early life history and reproductive biology of scombrids conducted at the Achotines Laboratory from 1985 to 2005

Margulies, Daniel and Scholey, Venon P. and Wexler, Jeanne B. and Olson, R.A. and Suter, Jenny M. and Hunt, Sharon L. (2007) A review of IATTC research on the early life history and reproductive biology of scombrids conducted at the Achotines Laboratory from 1985 to 2005. La Jolla, CA, Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commision, 67pp. (Special Report, 16)

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Abstract

English: For nearly a century, fisheries scientists have studied marine fish stocks in an effort to understand how the abundances of fish populations are determined. During the early lives of marine fishes, survival is variable, and the numbers of individuals surviving to transitional stages or recruitment are difficult to predict. The egg, larval, and juvenile stages of marine fishes are characterized by high rates of mortality and growth. Most marine fishes, particularly pelagic species, are highly fecund, produce small eggs and larvae, and feed and grow in complex aquatic ecosystems. The identification of environmental or biological factors that are most important in controlling survival during the early life stages of marine fishes is a potentially powerful tool in stock assessment. Because vital rates (mortality and growth) during the early life stages of marine fishes are high and variable, small changes in those rates can have profound effects on the properties of survivors and recruitment potential (Houde 1989). Understanding and predicting the factors that most strongly influence pre-recruit survival are key goals of fisheries research programs. Spanish: Desde hace casi un siglo, los científicos pesqueros han estudiado las poblaciones de peces marinos en un intento por entender cómo se determina la abundancia de las mismas. Durante la vida temprana de los peces marinos, la supervivencia es variable, y el número de individuos que sobrevive hasta las etapas transicionales o el reclutamiento es difícil de predecir. Las etapas de huevo, larval, y juvenil de los peces marinos son caracterizadas por tasas altas de mortalidad y crecimiento. La mayoría de los peces marinos, particularmente las especies pelágicas, son muy fecundos, producen huevos y larvas pequeños, y se alimentan y crecen en ecosistemas acuáticos complejos. La identificación los factores ambientales o biológicos más importantes en el control de la supervivencia durante las etapas tempranas de vida de los peces marinos es una herramienta potencialmente potente en la evaluación de las poblaciones. Ya que las tasas vitales (mortalidad y crecimiento) durante las etapas tempranas de vida de los peces marinos son altas y variables, cambios pequeños en esas tasas pueden ejercer efectos importantes sobre las propiedades de los supervivientes y el potencial de reclutamiento (Houde 1989). Comprender y predecir los factores que más afectan la supervivencia antes del reclutamiento son objetivos clave de los programas de investigación pesquera.

Item Type: Monograph or Serial Issue
Title: A review of IATTC research on the early life history and reproductive biology of scombrids conducted at the Achotines Laboratory from 1985 to 2005
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Margulies, Daniel
Scholey, Venon P.
Wexler, Jeanne B.
Olson, R.A.
Suter, Jenny M.
Hunt, Sharon L.
Series Name: Special Report
Number: 16
Number of Pages: 67
Date: 2007
Publisher: Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commision
Place of Publication: La Jolla, CA
Issuing Agency: Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission
Additional Information: This issue is bilingual and contains both English and Spanish versions.
Subjects: Fisheries
Item ID: 6831
Depositing User: Joan Parker
Date Deposited: 04 Oct 2011 12:40
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2011 12:50
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/6831

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