A comparison between circle hook and J hook performance in the dolphinfish, yellowfish tuna, and wahoo troll fishery off the coast of North Carolina

Rudershausen, Paul J. and Buckel, Jeffrey A. and Bolton, Greg E. and Gregory, Randy W. and Averett, Tyler W. and Conn, Paul B. (2012) A comparison between circle hook and J hook performance in the dolphinfish, yellowfish tuna, and wahoo troll fishery off the coast of North Carolina. Fishery Bulletin, 110(2), pp. 156-175.

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Abstract

We compared numbers of strikes, proportions of fish that hooked up after strikes, proportions of fish that stayed on hook (retained) after hook up, and numbers of fish caught between circle and J hooks rigged with dead natural fish bait (ballyhoo)and trolled for three oceanic predator species: dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), and wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri). Interactions were compared between circle and J hooks fished on 75 trips by two user groups (charter and recreational fishermen). Hooks were affixed to three species-specific leader types most commonly fished in this region: monofilament (dolphinfish), fluorocarbon (tuna), and wire (wahoo). Numbers of fish caught per trip and three potential mechanisms that might inf luence numbers caught (i.e., number of strikes, proportion of fish hooked, and proportion retained) were modeled with generalized linear models that considered hook type, leader type, species, user (fishing) group, and wave height as main effects. Hook type was a main effect at the catch level; generally, more fish were caught on J hooks than on circle hooks. The effect of hook type on strike rates was equivocal. However, J hooks had a greater proportion of hook-ups than did circle hooks. Finally, the proportion of fish retained once hooked was generally equal between hook types. We found similar results when data from additional species were pooled as a “tuna” group and a “mackerel” group. We conclude that J hooks are more effective than circle hooks at the hook-up level and result in greater numbers of troll-caught dolphinfish, tunas

Item Type: Article
Title: A comparison between circle hook and J hook performance in the dolphinfish, yellowfish tuna, and wahoo troll fishery off the coast of North Carolina
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Rudershausen, Paul J.
Buckel, Jeffrey A.
Bolton, Greg E.
Gregory, Randy W.
Averett, Tyler W.
Conn, Paul B.
Journal or Publication Title: Fishery Bulletin
Volume: 110
Number: 2
Page Range: pp. 156-175
Date: April 2012
ISSN: 0090-0656
Issuing Agency: United States National Marine Fisheries Service
Subjects: Biology
Ecology
Fisheries
Management
Item ID: 8676
Depositing User: Patti M. Marraro
Date Deposited: 05 Jun 2012 13:30
Last Modified: 05 Jun 2012 13:30
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/8676

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