Estimates of commercial longline selectivity for Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) from multiple marking experiments

Clark, William G. Clark and Kaimmer, Stephen M. (2006) Estimates of commercial longline selectivity for Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) from multiple marking experiments. Fishery Bulletin, 104(3), pp. 465-467.

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Abstract

The term “selectivity” refers to the relationship between the size (or age) of a fish and its vulnerability to a given kind of fishing gear. A selectivity schedule, along with other parameters, is normally estimated in the course of fitting a stock assessment model, and the estimated schedule can have a large effect on both the estimate of present stock abundance and the choice of an appropriate harvest rate. The form of the relationship is usually not known and not well determined by the data, and equally good model fits can often be obtained with different plausible specifications of selectivity. Choosing among the model fits and associated abundance estimates in this situation is problematic (Sigler, 1999; Sullivan et al., 19

Item Type: Article
Title: Estimates of commercial longline selectivity for Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) from multiple marking experiments
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Clark, William G. Clark
Kaimmer, Stephen M.
Refereed: Yes
Journal or Publication Title: Fishery Bulletin
Volume: 104
Number: 3
Page Range: pp. 465-467
Date: 2006
ISSN: 0090-0656
Issuing Agency: United States National Marine Fisheries Service
Subjects: Biology
Ecology
Fisheries
Item ID: 8983
Depositing User: Patti M. Marraro
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2012 19:03
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2012 19:03
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/8983

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