Tracking Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus orientalis) in the northeastern Pacific with an automated algorithm that estimates latitude by matching sea-surface-temperature data from satellites with temperature data from tags on fish

Domeier, Michael L and Kiefer, Dale and Nasby-Lucas, Nicole and Wagschal, Adam and O’Brien, Frank (2005) Tracking Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus orientalis) in the northeastern Pacific with an automated algorithm that estimates latitude by matching sea-surface-temperature data from satellites with temperature data from tags on fish. Fishery Bulletin, 103(2), pp. 292-306.

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Abstract

Data recovered from 11 popup satellite archival tags and 3 surgically implanted archival tags were used to analyze the movement patterns of juvenile northern bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus orientalis) in the eastern Pacific. The light sensors on archival and pop-up satellite transmitting archival tags (PSATs) provide data on the time of sunrise and sunset, allowing the calculation of an approximate geographic position of the animal. Light-based estimates of longitude are relatively robust but latitude estimates are prone to large degrees of error, particularly near the times of the equinoxes and when the tag is at low latitudes. Estimating latitude remains a problem for researchers using light-based geolocation algorithms and it has been suggested that sea surface temperature data from satellites may be a useful tool for refining latitude estimates. Tag data from bluefin tuna were subjected to a newly developed algorithm, called “PSAT Tracker,” which automatically matches sea surface temperature data from the tags with sea surface temperatures recorded by satellites. The results of this algorithm compared favorably to the estimates of latitude calculated with the lightbased algorithms and allowed for estimation of fish positions during times of the year when the lightbased algorithms failed. Three near one-year tracks produced by PSAT tracker showed that the fish range from the California−Oregon border to southern Baja California, Mexico, and that the majority of time is spent off the coast of central Baja Mexico. A seasonal movement pattern was evident; the fish spend winter and spring off central Baja California, and summer through fall is spent moving northward to Oregon and returning to Baja California.

Item Type: Article
Title: Tracking Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus orientalis) in the northeastern Pacific with an automated algorithm that estimates latitude by matching sea-surface-temperature data from satellites with temperature data from tags on fish
Personal Creator/Author:
CreatorsEmail
Domeier, Michael L
Kiefer, Dale
Nasby-Lucas, Nicole
Wagschal, Adam
O’Brien, Frank
Refereed: Yes
Journal or Publication Title: Fishery Bulletin
Volume: 103
Number: 2
Page Range: pp. 292-306
Date: 2005
ISSN: 0090-0656
Issuing Agency: United States National Marine Fisheries Service
Subjects: Biology
Ecology
Fisheries
Item ID: 9615
Depositing User: Patti M. Marraro
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2012 14:32
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2012 14:32
URI: http://aquaticcommons.org/id/eprint/9615

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